A Cure for His Past, Present and Future

“I’m no scientist or doctor, but I can take my passion in music and use it to hopefully make a positive impact,” shares Chicago musician Bryan Adamick. With his band the Struggs, Bryan is fighting Alzheimer’s disease by raising awareness and funds on the road.

Alzheimer’s has always been a factor in Bryan’s life. “My maternal grandfather suffered from Alzheimers in the late 80’s and early 90’s when I was in grade school,” says Bryan. “We lost my wife’s paternal grandmother to Alzheimer’s in 2013.” About 10 years ago, Bryan’s mother was diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer’s disease. She is now in an assisted living facility as she faces the advanced stages of the disease.

“Alzheimer’s disease takes smart, talented, proud people and turns them into a shell of themselves,” confides Bryan. “While all illness is difficult, Alzheimer’s really puts another level of mental and emotional strain on loved ones, because it feels as though the person you knew and loved for so many years is already lost, and yet, more than ever, they need a great deal of love, care, and extra attention.

Bryan and his family have found help through the Alzheimer’s Association. Both Bryan and his father regularly attend an Association-led support group. Support groups educate and inform participants about dementia and help attendees develop methods and skills to solve problems.

“When my grandfather was suffering from Alzheimer’s…my parents told me that by the time they were older, there would probably be a cure for Alzheimers,” shares Bryan. “Fast forward 30 years and there still is no cure.”

For Bryan, Alzheimer’s disease factors in his past, his present and possibly his future. 

“I’m now married with my own children (7 and 5 years old)…I recognize that there is still no fix in place, and with both my wife and my family prone to this disease, it dawned on me a few years ago that it’s about time I start taking action and doing my part.

Bryan joined the fight to end Alzheimer’s through his musical talents. He is a founding member of Chicago-based band the Struggs. Bryan is a prolific songwriter for the group. He also provides vocals, bass and acoustic guitar at live shows and on their records. 

The Struggs took their music around the region last year through a Summer Tour of Midwest Garages. Many venues were closed due to the pandemic, so they played their blend of rock and alternative country in open garages. Bryan shared his connection to Alzheimer’s disease at every stop and collected donations. With more than 6 million Americans living with Alzheimer’s disease, the band met many individuals who had similar stories. Many fans were inspired to give.

In October, the Struggs lent their energetic sound to the Chicago Walk to End Alzheimer’s. Their music was an up-beat backdrop to the day’s activities. Bryan even got his whole family involved. 

“My favorite part of the Walk this year was seeing my kids starting to understand a little more of what Grandma is going through,” Bryan says. “They learned about the Promise Flowers and what the colors represented and held them up in honor of their Grandma and Great Grandma.”

Are you interested in using a talent or existing hobby to fight the darkness of Alzheimer’s disease? Start a fundraiser with The Longest Day

The Struggs’ newest record Common Sense & Accidents comes out Friday, January 7. It will be available digitally on Spotify, Apple Music, Amazon and most major platforms.

From www.thestruggsmusic.com: Based in Chicago, the Struggs formed from numerous different bands and musical influences to create their own brand of rock/pop/alt country weaving catchy choruses and harmonies with soaring guitar riffs and solos. Established in 2015, they have played a variety of clubs and festivals, most recently raising money for the Alzheimer’s Association on a Summer Tour of Midwest Garages while clubs were closed. In 2022, the band will release its 3rd LP entitled Common Sense & Accidents.

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